Potato minerals - Potatoes of Red and Yellow Peel Color
Potatoes of Red and Yellow Peel Color

Potato – 4. Composition, Quality Characteristics & Nutrition Facts of Potatoes - Potato Minerals

The fourth part of the paradoxically popular series on the composition, quality characteristics and nutritional value of tubers of Solanum tuberosum has as its subject the potato minerals.

 An issue for which it is open and courageous to say that its choice was not accidental. And it was not accidental because the editorial team of ‘Kalliergeia’ had long known that the series had acquired a slightly light character that was totally inappropriate and out of its constitutional intentions.

Including the metallic elements of the potato minerals in the series, it is a fact that now acquires the weight it was missing. And with this weight it is finally delivered to the reader with hands up.

Potato – 4. Composition, Quality Characteristics & Nutrition Facts of Potatoes

Potato minerals - Potato Harvesting from Home Vegetable Garden
Potato Harvesting from Home Vegetable Garden

Potato Minerals

Mineral salts and trace minerals play an important role in the human organism. Their presence and uninterrupted function as enzyme components, antioxidants and electrolytes from one another, as well as  structural components of teeth and bones, on the other hand, make them valuable data for maintaining health. But because their stocks are consumed, they must be constantly replenished with nutrition.

Potato is a key source of intake for most of them. Consuming a portion of potato a day offers 30-48% of the recommended daily intake (%RDI) for macrominerals (except for calcium and sodium) and 6-82% of the recommended daily intake for trace minerals.

However, it is characteristic that the potato minerals are mainly found in the peel. Therefore, in order to fully exploit them, potatoes should be consumed frequently with the peel.

Potato – 4. Composition, Quality Characteristics & Nutrition Facts of Potatoes

Potato minerals - Potato Tubers Together with Roots in the Plant
Potato Tubers Together with Roots in the Plant

Potato Minerals Content

As is the case with almost all vegetables, potato minerals have the highest content of potassium. Potassium, which significantly affects the distribution of water in the body by regulating cell osmotic pressure, is found in amounts ranging from 443-564 mg per 100 g of fresh tuber weight.

This quantity is significantly higher than other foods that have been identified as the main sources of potassium intake, such as broccoli, bananas and oranges.

Of the remaining macrominerals, the potato contains calcium 6-18 mg and phosphorus 30-60 mg per 100 g of fresh weight.

Compared to other potato minerals, magnesium (25 mg per 100 g of fresh weight), zinc and iron are important.

Potato – 4. Composition, Quality Characteristics & Nutrition Facts of Potatoes

Potato minerals - Potato Variety 'Orla'
Potato Variety 'Orla'
Potato minerals - 'Shetland Black' Variety Potato
'Shetland Black' Variety Potato
Potato minerals - Roasted Potatoes with Rosemary
Roasted Potatoes with Rosemary

Zinc and Iron in Potato

Zinc is a crucial element for the proper functioning of the cognitive skills of the brain. Potato is found in quantities ranging from 12.5 to 0.30 mg per 100 g of fresh weight. What is of particular importance and value is that the bioavailability of zinc is higher in potatoes than in comparison with many other fruits and vegetables.

The same applies to iron. While the potato iron content is not particularly high (1.3 mg or 6% of the recommended daily intake), the bioavailability of this element in potatoes exceeds that of many other vegetables rich in iron.

The explanation lies in the fact of the absence or extremely low levels of chelates and other similar types of compounds which inhibit the absorption of iron (eg tannins) and vitamin C on the other.

Vitamin C in the potato – which will be referred to in a further tribute – is high. And the presence of vitamin C has been shown to enhance the absorption of iron.

Here it is worth noting that potato varieties with red peel contain more iron than others.

Like ZZ Top ‘La Grange’.

  1. Brown, C. R. (2008). Breeding for phytonutrient enhancement of potato. Am. J.Potato Res., 85:298–307.
  2. Mary Ellen Camire, Stan Kubow & Danielle J. Donnelly (2009): Potatoes and Human Health, Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition, 49:10, 823-840
  3. White, P. J. and Broadley, M. R. (2005). Biofortifying crops with essentialmineral elements. Trends Plant Sci., 10:586–593.
  4. Woolfe, J. A. (1987). The Potato in the Human Diet. Cambridge University p. 143–149.
Landscape with Lake in the Andes Mountains
Landscape with Lake in the Andes Mountains

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