IARC

The IARC Headquarters in Lyon
The IARC Headquarters in Lyon

IARC is the acronym of the English words International Agency for Research on Cancer. The IARC is an independent part of the United Nations World Health Organization (WHO) and its base is in the beautiful city of Lyon, France. 

By the way, in French the name of this U.N. research center is Centre International de Recherche sur le Cancer, and its acronym is CIRC.

CONTENTS

DOCUMENTS

The logo of IARC or CIRC (Center International de Recherche sur le Cancer) as it is called in French.

The Logo of IARC
IARC's Logo

IARC - Objective of Establishment & Features

The International Agency for Research on Cancer established with a view to promote international co-ordination and interdisciplinary collaboration on research to identify the causes of cancer.

Combining biostatistics, laboratory sciences and epidemiology suggests that preventive measures be taken to reduce the extent and weight of diseases, as well as the resulting pain caused by various types of cancer.

Its expertise in coordinating research among countries and organizations, as well as organizing and conducting research in low- and middle-income countries through partnerships and collaborations with researchers in these regions, are its specific features.

The IARC, however, is not directly involved in the implementation of control measures nor conducts research on the treatment or care of cancer patients.

From the IARC editions, the Monograph volume 113, dedicated to DDT, LINDANE and 2,4-D.

IARC Monographs Volume 113
IARC's Monograph Volume 113 Cover

The International Agency for Research on Cancer and the Categories of Carcinogenicity Agents

The IARC carries out research into carcinogens, which may be substances, mixtures or exposures to environments. The results of the investigations lead to the classification of carcinogenic agents in five categories:

Category 1: Carcinogenic to humans.

This category includes all the agents that lead to the conclusion that they can cause cancer in humans.

Category 2A: Probably carcinogenic to humans.

This category includes all agents for which there are strong indications that they can cause cancer in humans but are not conclusive for the time being.

Category 2B: Possibly carcinogenic to humans.

This category includes all agents for which there are some indications that they can cause cancer in humans, but are currently insufficient to be considered as critical.

Category 3: Not classifiable as to its carcinogenicity to humans.

This category includes all agents for which there are currently no indications that they can cause cancer in humans.

Category 4: Probably not carcinogenic to humans.

This category includes all agents for which there are strong indications that they do not cause cancer in humans.

An idyllic scene from rural life.

IARC - Soybean Spraying Tractor
Tractor Spraying Soybean

According to IARC Carcinogenic Agents & Pesticides

Since 1971, more than 1000 agents have been evaluated in the IARC, more than 400 of which have been identified as carcinogens, probably carcinogenic, or possibly carcinogenic to humans.

Category 1 includes 120 agents, some of which are active substances used in pesticides.

Category 2A includes 82 agents, some of which are also active substances used in pesticides.

Category 2B includes 299 agents, some of which are again active substances used in pesticides.

Category 3 includes 502 agents, some of which are fortunately active substances used in pesticides.

Category 4 includes only one (1) agent, caprolactam, which unfortunately is not an active substance used in pesticides but is the precursor compound for synthetic nylon-6 polymer (polycaprolactam), with the scope of synthetic fibers and plastics.

References

The References of the highly horrifying article on the IARC entry are show out by Κωνσταντής Πιστιόλης (Konstantis Pistiolis), with the always optimistic traditional Greek song ‘Πες μας Χάρε να χαρείς‘ (Tell us Grim Reaper if you pleased).

  1. Kornuta, N., Bagley, E., & Nedopitanskaya, N. (1996). Genotoxic effects of pesticides. Journal of Environmental Pathology, Toxicology and Oncology, 15, 75-78.
  2. Vainio, H., & Wilbourn, J. (1992). Identification of carcinogens within the IARC monograph program. Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment & Health, 18(1), 64-73.
  3. Vainio, H., & Wilbourn, J. (1992). Identification of carcinogens within the IARC monograph program. Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment & Health, 18(1), 64-73.
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VIDEO

Tell us Grim Reaper if you pleased‘ (Πες μας Χάρε να χαρείς) by Konstantis Pistiolis, at a concert given in 2016 in ‘Technopolis’ of Athens

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